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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 451 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 8:00pm PST
between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental disconnect between how we view philosophy
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
conservatives, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commercial that goes something like this when you pay too much for cable you through things and if you throw things people think you have anger issues some people think you have anger issues in your schedule up and you grow a scraggly beard and you start taking in stray animals and you can't stop taking in stray animals don't pay much for cable. i have my own version today to the appeal to the kafeel you have a checkup and when he gives you a check that you have a flu shot at a tetanus booster. when you have the booster do
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:00pm EST
religion and politics with george will. next, a discussion on climate science, politics and global warming. panelists talked about what they think is next for the american west, texas, and north east due to climate change, and attitudes about science from the public. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here today. welcome to clement won, a conversation about climate energy. burning fossil fuels release [indiscernible] they accepted the the fundamentals of climates science. today, things are different. skeptics are winning the comic communication battle even as temperatures rise and the intensity increases worldwide. over the next hour, we will talk about high school physics and chemistry and how science has committed in the public realm. we are joined by three distinguished scientists. michael mann is the author of "hockey and the current war." and a student from stanford university. >> i should mention that bill is here on very short notice. thank you for stepping in on such short notice you pu
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 7:00pm EST
had lured you into science. in science is deliberate parenting. nonstop hurricane. according to the book in her lap, the first two rules are number one, the truth at any price, including the price of your life and number two, look at things as though you've never seen him before. then proceed from there. look at things that everyone takes for granted and then see what you learn. so the next big question will be more important than the next answer. new questions can produce scientific links. insights that nine years later, a guy we'll call for a pure and i'm sure. it becomes your mission. finding the question that will produce the next big perception. an unfolding this point that will allow others to radically pursue how did god get into the picture? the bar mitzvah is coming up in your 12 years old. your dad is going through a party for all the kids that you know, all the kids who humiliate you three quarters of a mile from your home. this time you are invited. yes, you are invited and this is the first time you will attend a celebration with your peers. congratulations. it gets bet
SFGTV2
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm PST
another meeting, from the breast cancer fund, we have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer,
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 11:30pm EST
copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> a discussion on climate science and politics. paul by director of nasa's goddard institute of space studies. another look at religion and politics. tomorrow, we are joined by the indiana rep. he will talk about the 113th congress in his priorities. join us sunday at 10:00 eastern and again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> as president obama begins his second term, what is the most important issue? >> if you are in grades 6 through 12, make a video about your message to the president. is your chance to win $5,000. the deadline is january 18. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> next a discussion on climate science, politics, and global warming. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about one hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here. welcome. seven years ago, there was a consensus in washington that the earth's atmosphere could be altered. it is a different story. over the next hour, we will discuss opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:05pm EST
] >> we continue the discussion on climate science now with james hanson, head of the nasa institute for space studies and author of "storms of my grandchildren." he was awarded an award named for the scientist who advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and en
PBS
Dec 29, 2012 11:30am PST
science education and further society's understanding of the life sciences including the impact of gee ownmics on the practice of medicine. >> and by sam's club. committed to small business and the spirit of the entrepreneur. and proud to support pbs's to the contrary with bonnie erbe. additional funding provided by... this week on a special edition of to the contrary, we take an indepth look at dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare diseases. [♪] >> hello i'm bonnie erbe welcome to to the contrary a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. this week we show you how advances in dna sequencing are helping scientists find cures for rare diseases especially rare childhood diseases. dr. james lupski is a man with a mission as a pediatrician at baylor college of medicine in houston, dr. lupski has devoted much of his medical career to researching and treating children with rare diseases. >> the patients that i mainly see in the clinic are children and families in which a genetic disease will
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:40am EST
you actually talk climate science 26 hours a day. but could you tell us a little bit of your conversations with sophie? thank you. >> yeah. so i don't think that it's appropriate to frighten children. [laughter]. and i -- so the only thing that -- until -- now, sophie is -- i have five grandchildren, sophie is the oldest, and finally, i am starting to explain the problem and the fact that there are solutions. but, other than that, i just -- the only thing that i've really done with grandchildren related to this is to try to help them understand nature. so for -- in particular, as i mentioned in my book, we have addressed the monarch butterfly problem. you know, a monarch butterfly as we've noticed on our farm, they are many fewer than they used to be, and that's mainly because not of global warming, but because of pesticides which have been used to reduce the number of milkweeds. and that -- so, therefore, with my grandchildren, we plant milkweeds. and then they learn about this remarkable life cycle of monarch butterflies which migrate all the way to mexico. well, i did -- i
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 2:00pm EST
space program but in terms of science and everything else that goes along, it ended up being washed away in stimulus funds. as this hearing has highlighted, the approach to this lacks clear mission. he is relying on the success of commercial space. i strongly support a public /private partnership for our space policy. it is up to now said to develop the heavy lift rocket because the private sector does the not have enough funds to do it by itself. that rocket means a net to overcome the administration's shortsightedness. they supported a mission to the moon. president obama has taken a been there done that approach. we have not been there for 40 years. the partners would have helped us. they have never been there. this will fill the void be left behind. that will have a trickle down of that on the number of people that we train as scientists and engineers to keep america's pre- eminence in practically everything else. would you please discuss the problems caused by the cancellation of the program and what is needed from congress in this current fiscal environment to insure the succe
SFGTV2
Dec 30, 2012 12:30pm PST
believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn, those ex
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:35am EST
something to discredit me, it turned out that it was a fellow republican, the chair of the house science committee, pro- sons, pro-environmental republican who came to defend my colleagues and me in this political witch hunt by his own fellow republican. a think you'll find this among many of my colleagues and scientists today. we do our best to frame this not as a bipartisan or political issue because it should not be. it is a fact of life that it has become somewhat of a partisan political issue. but there is some evidence that there are people on the republican side of the aisle were stepping up to challenge and do something about this problem. >> we sometimes make the mistake of saying that [indiscernible] science and values can provide the same information. i think they are completely complementary. signs is able to tell us what the problem is and what the consequences are of the trees is we make. our values is what happens from the sources. a village in alaska considers it already happened. a town and a texas might think it will not happen for a few tickets are lunker. we have to b
KRON
Dec 25, 2012 11:00pm PST
sunny for the last day of 2012 and the last day on tuesday >>> we've seen break throughs in science and john has the top ten science stories at 2010 >> a revolutionary light called litro. >> this will change how we take and experience pictures. >> the camera captures the light field, allowing focus to be changed after it has been taken. no. 9, nasa space craft sent data about an asteroid. it appears vesta went through planet evolution and it's one of a kind. to be one of e only one that's left. >> no. 8, you may have heard the term god pardon cal. the european nuclear center claims to have found it. why is it a ci,]w:qbig deal? think big bang theory. >> in this particle, this set off the explosion that creates the universe. >> after analyzing data generated by an accelerator. >> at 7, a leap of faith. record breaking jump. bub broke the free fall record jumping from 128,000 feet in a space suit. >> i said the whole world is watching and i wish the world could see. cambodiag5a[([ and a package cac 71 was aggressive. he was there when the mystery was solved. >> those organizism and th
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 11:00am EST
language and technology intervention and art and science. which no other primate has done. there are simple examples of primates creating tools or using language but not in this indefinitely expanded hierarchical fashion that humans do. >> host: you are thinking of the main functions of the neocortex as high level functions such as decisionsmaking, inhibiting improper action, not so much -- see neocortex as a huge number of things. >> guest: it does lots of things that high and low levels using the same algorithms. lot of pattern recognizers like the edges of objects or the capital wa and all these primitive functions. it is a high-level conceptual hierarchy. one powerful piece of evidence that came out as i was sending this to the publisher is what happens to the region of the neocortex ready optic words ago? it is very primitive pattern like the edges of objects. it is low level, very simple pattern. what happens to it? a blind person who is not getting any visual information, actually gets taken over by the frontal cortex to help process high-level language concepts. here is the s
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
these wonderful transforming experiences for readers. carson had only taken science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to and so she'd become one of america's most celebrated a beloved authors in the silent spring turned a very different direction. "silent spring" is a disturbing book, a worrisome book to point that what we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. since it's not 1962 anymore, i thought i would explain more for you about who rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in the house in springfield, pennsylvania. when a person was born in the upstairs bedroom of the house, at the time did not have the addition on the brick inside. very simple, very modest house, four runs. two downstairs and two bedrooms upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couple of couple of outhouses out that. a shed in the front of vacation i kept it worse and there was a little bit out of the west.??? there is enough property around the house that carson could explore the woods, often with her mother a
NBC
Dec 24, 2012 2:50am EST
able to take advantage of the latest in skin care science. we don't want the cost to keep you from trying it and that's why we've created this special offer. we know that once you experience the miracle of great-looking skin, that you'll become a philosophy believer and we welcome you. >> female announcer: now's the time to call or go online because for a limited time, we're including free shipping. so don't wait, order your box of miracles by philosophy today and start looking as young as you feel. call or go online now. [♪...] call or go online now. [♪...] >> kimberley: welcome back to my quest to learn everything i can about the box of miracles by philosophy-- the brand that's acclaimed by doctors, celebrities and beauty experts like ross burton. he's the emmy-nominated makeup artist for the oprah winfrey show and one of philosophy's biggest fans. ...oh, lovely to meet you. >> welcome, welcome, so great to have you. >> so, ross, how awesome is it to have oprah as one of your clients? >> oh, kimberley, i mean, think of it. >> yes. >> it's a dream job. >> i'm curious to know:
SFGTV2
Dec 22, 2012 4:30pm PST
basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this w
SFGTV
Dec 29, 2012 11:30am PST
museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create silicon valley. i mentioned one person but there are many other examples. along with that we will have a big conference with italian innovators and venture capitalists and along with large hi tech companies of silicon valley and come together and focus on specific projects how to work together for technological innovation. it will be focused on silicon valley but also the cultural institute in san francisco we have surprises for you that we're preparing. any other questions? >> [inaudible] >> yeah. >> [inaudible] the problem of the public -- i would like for you to answer it -- [inaudible] >> i try not to be technical, but i hope i would be pervasive just telling you the debt crisis is basically a crisis connected to the governments of the euro system that has hit some countries for some reasons. somewhat we were hit because of the sins of our past. we have been having -- we have had a relatively a sizable but stable debt for a long time, but the point is it's very manageable. we are
FOX Business
Dec 25, 2012 3:00pm EST
disclosure that if there is money to be made it by science. but we want to kill each other and my colleagues will run over their grandmother for the advancement. [laughter] >> absolutely. there is not very many rich scientist. you have your place in fame but it is the discovery. john: why don't people know about anarchy? >> it to tries to make itself look good. looking at the atomic bomb, experiments on prisoners of four it is in the name of science. the scientist for trusted they made sure they did not do anything to scare the public fish show thmselves as trustworthy. we will not blow up the world. john: even know about -- albert einstein. >> i thought he proved the theory of relativity. >> he was brilliant. >> = mcs glared? >> not qui einstein. he owned it and tried to prove it eight times and he even wrote that in the footnotes. let's go on anyway. his colleagues in new this. he covered every other thing in science but he left out the equals mc squared out. that shows you how he felt. >> i don't think we john: do you cheat? ever? never? you lied to be polite. maybe you take home the pens
SFGTV2
Dec 26, 2012 9:30am PST
new california academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:20pm EST
is driven by strong and steady passions and interests, to that extent, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. people will be self interested. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is cap
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default. when you think of who the l
CBS
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
rare glimpse inside the science behind the field sobriety tests. what officers look for and how it all works. >> now we look at the science in action as the officers and our cameras leave the lab and hit the roads. delia goncalves has the exclusive ridealong with park police and this was really interesting. >> reporter: you know, when i spoke to park police during the day, they said these are the signs and this is what we see. we literally saw it all on the roads when we were out with them. this is the holiday season and so certainly very busy for them. unfortunately, when you take a look at this video, it is rare but it does show us just how widespread the problem of drinking and driving is on our local roads. ♪ we first met park police sergeant during the day. >> it's like i say to everybody it's a front row seat to the greatest show on earth. >> reporter: he said his best work at night. so he invited us out friday night to bw parkway. >> we're stopping people that have alcohol levels that are on average a .16 which is double the legal limit. >> reporter: the shift starts off s
SFGTV2
Dec 24, 2012 9:00pm PST
writing in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chr
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:15pm EST
. and now the question is, with running science in order to expand science which is what i have done, then okay, now the normal credentialing process to take it seriously. [inaudible] >> to bring everything back down a little bit to the pragmatic, i don't have a science background but i am a political science -- and i was struck with the wave in the comparison of it with the stock market which is hanging around in the back of my head, and i haven't read it yet but the idea of lots of discrete entities doing things, creating something larger with or without people, with or without that intention of creating something larger. is this already being done, to apply this to policy say you know okay we want to do this. we are doing it this way but it's not working or all of these actions we are taking are somehow creating this other thing that we haven't even thought about. i feel like there could he and education, sort of guide to how we would put recruitment strategies or how to use them as a tool in other fields? >> i think you're absolutely right in that is why had done this thing up di
CBS
Dec 28, 2012 5:00am EST
a great behind the scenes look at the science behind field sobriety tests. they gave us unlimited access and very rare access into kind of behind the scenes. and so -- >> these are real people and real situations, the video is awesome. you don't want to miss this. it's really cool. thanks. >>> well, you can gamble 24 hours a day. 7 days a week at maryland live casino now. that's because maryland voters as you may remember approved the gambling referendum that made it possible and operators say the expanded hours at the hanover facility will lead to more jobs and more revenue for the state. the state's two other casinos have not adopted the 24/7 schedule yet. >>> i am watching your money. on wall street we've been down for four sessions in a row. hopefully we can change things today. but who knows? yesterday, stocks did head into positive territory briefly after lawmakers in the house announced plans to meet sunday to discuss the fiscal cliff. congress and the white house have less than a week to resolve this impasse. but here's where we did end up. checking the numbers for you --
PBS
Dec 29, 2012 1:30am PST
margin of victory for the democrats. and there are folks who with political science looking at this who will say that latinos are really -- that republicans are leaving a lot of latino votes on the table because they're not participating in a comprehensive immigration reform, and i think that that's something that we're going to start to see change. yeah. >> and let me just add to that, too. you touched on it earlier, josh, this whole idea of the divide, the economic divide and the haves and the have-nots, and certainly, latino voters are part of the have-nots in many occasions. the occupy movement, which really got started in 2011, but really exploded in places like oak laerland earlier this year. what impact do you think that had on the national conversation? >> i think it enshrined a place in the national dialogue for issues like income disparity. i mean, the whole fiscal cliff situation is very much, look at the way that's being framed. 98% versus 2%. it's very close to the 99% that was the rallying cry of occupy, and the same thing with the argument over jobs versus austerity. are
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 8:00am EST
science of human relationships, paid off. and i think that that's hugely important. and i mean it. i mean, dinner does not always end well. you can talk to jesus about that, you know? [laughter] never mind. never mind about that. [laughter] that's not here. last thing quickly, the politics of hope, every successful american president has convinced us that present pain is really an investment can and that a sacrifice in in the moment is not simply to be austere, for austerity's sake, but to make tomorrow better than today. whatever they can, they will, jefferson of americans. and the idea, he said i like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past which is very painful for me because i like both, of course. but he was able to project a vision of a reality that we could not see, but that he wanted us to reach. and i think that that's absolutely essential. as i said, we always learn more from sinners than from saints. his role in the perpetuation and protection of slavery is the great standing conviction, it's not an indictment, it's a conviction before the bar of history. i
FOX Business
Dec 24, 2012 10:00pm EST
less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk talk" is coming up so, this board gives me rates for progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negotiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thought i would show you what thuld happen if we change into the speaker boehner plan, the president obama plan, let's start out with the do-nothing plan because that's the plan we0 have right now. the cbo estimates fiscal year 2013 deficit will be, well,lionf $104 trillion for fiscal year al 2013.well, it's so we get up to 2014, it is going to be about $19.4 billion -- exc
NBC
Dec 23, 2012 2:30am EST
, dramatic change taking place in terms of charter schools, in terms of focusing on stem -- the science technology, engineering, and math. things that will transform american education which will transform the american economy. >> this is a very good point. and a lot of, right now, across theountry seeing certain areas become rewired for what you're talking about, technology and science. gentlemen, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> great to have you on the program. charles bronfman and jeffrey saloms solom solomon. >>> up next, the news that will have an impact on your money and what autton wood tree and ice what autton wood tree and ice have in common. >>> we have some big news to tell you about beginning in january we will have a new home. look for "on the money with maria bartiromo." we will exciting new segments for, you great guests and, of course, i will be here as well. join news january. first, look at the stories coming up in the week ahead that may move the market and impact your money this week. monday is a shortened trading trade on wall street. the noshl stock exchange
SFGTV2
Dec 27, 2012 4:00am PST
scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a usa today story and suicid
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 6:30pm EST
operators -- what operators like to call a science fiction movie. that is deliberate. it are modeled after science fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. when you walk in, it is a bit like walking into a machine. the buildings are incredibly loud and cold from the air- conditioners that keep the machines cool. you cannot see the ceiling. there are usually cages around. big steel cages about half the size of a hotel room. each belongs to a network. that is where they keep the equipment securely. they interconnect aims that way. that is the physical connection. >> when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what are those wires made of? >> the predominately centers of the internet, the most important places are fiber-optic cables. there often yellow jumper cables. inside of them are strands of glass. inside of that glass our pulses of light. nano second morse code that can carry a baseline of about 10 gigabits or second of data. maybe 10,000 times in your
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